How to Use Psychometric Testing in Hiring

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10 Important Questions to Help Identify High Potential Leaders

We all want our Talent Management processes to identify High Potential Leaders as early as possible in their careers — here are 10 questions that can help….

Rise Performance Group

dv1990116By Dario Priolo

According to research from the Corporate Executive Board, 40% of internal job moves made by people identified by their companies as “high potentials” end in failure. Many organizations make the mistake of looking simply at ability when assessing an employee for a management job. Think of the hot-shot sales rep or the genius software engineer. It is incredible how often high producing individuals get promoted into management jobs that require a totally different mindset to be successful.

The reason these people fail often comes down to three critical factors: leadership behaviors, aspiration and engagement. Aspiration entails whether the candidate really wants the position and is willing to make the sacrifices it may require. Engagement involves the employee’s commitment to the company and its mission. In focusing on whether an employee potentially can do a job, many organizations neglect the question, “Does he want to…

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The Top 20 Most Popular Talent Management Software Solutions | Capterra

The Top 20 Most Popular Talent Management Software Solutions | Capterra.

Talent Management software is used by companies to recruit, manage, evaluate and compensate employees. One of the fastest growing sectors within the HR software industry, the talent management software market is currently estimated to be $4-6 billion. Below is a look at the most popular options as measured by a combination of their total number of clients, active users and online presence. In order to see a comprehensive list, please visit our Talent Management Software Directory.

The Top 20 Most Popular Talent Management Software Solutions

© 2012 Capterra, Inc.

 

 

TOP JOBS FOR 2013 – HR is #5

Jacquelyn Smith, Forbes Staff

If it has to do with leadership, jobs, or careers, I’m on it.

12/06/2012 @ 12:01AM |53,393 views

The Top Jobs for 2013

In Pictures: The Top 10 Jobs for 2013

In Pictures: The Top 10 Jobs for 2013

Struggling to find a job? If you’re an accountant, computer systems analyst or event coordinator, there’s a good chance your luck will change in 2013.

These three professions are among the best jobs that require a bachelor’s degree for 2013, according to a new study by CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI).

The study used EMSI’s rich labor market database, which pulls from over 90 national and state employment resources and includes detailed information on employees and self-employed workers, to find the 18 top jobs for 2013, based on the occupations with the most jobs added since 2010.

“The list identifies occupations that are on an upward trajectory regarding employment,” says Matt Ferguson, chief executive of CareerBuilder. “Job seekers can gain insights into where companies are expanding and opportunities that are available.”

More On Forbes: Cities Where People Earn The Biggest And Smallest Paychecks

The occupation that has produced the most jobs post-recession: Software developer (applications and systems software). Since 2010, 70,872 jobs have been added (7% growth).

Why? “Companies are competing to get to market first with innovations that will create new revenue streams,” Ferguson says. “They want to capitalize on mobile technologies and social media.  They want to extract, parse and apply Big Data to bring better solutions to their clients and their own businesses. They need technologists in place who can devise bigger and better strategies, and execute.”

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most software developers work for computer systems design and related services firms or software publishers. Others work in computer and electronic product manufacturing industries. They typically have a bachelor’s degree in computer science.

The average pay for these professionals is $90,530 a year, and the BLS expects a 30% increase in the number of software developers by 2020 (from 2010).

More On Forbes: The Easiest And Hardest Cities For Finding A Job

In the No. 2 spot is accountants and auditors. These professionals prepare and examine financial records, and ensure that taxes are paid properly and on time. Over 37,100 jobs have been added since 2010 (a 3% increase).

Most employers require an accountant or auditor job candidate to have a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field, and others will want the candidate to be certified within a specific field, according to the BLS. These professionals make $61,690, on average, per year.

The third best job for 2013: Market research analysts and marketing specialists. The profession has added 31,335 jobs since 2010, which is a 10% increase. According to the BLS, they earn about $60,570 a year, on average. The profession is expected to grow 41% by 2020 (from 2010).

What do they do? Market research analysts study market conditions to examine potential sales of a product or service. They help companies understand the marketplace; what products people want, who will buy them, and at what price. Strong math and analytical skills are typically required, as well as a bachelor’s degree. Top research positions often require a master’s, according to the BLS.

Elsewhere on the list: Computer systems analysts (No. 4), mechanical engineers (No. 9), and database administrators (No. 15).

“Technology and engineering roles make up the majority of the top ten positions, indicative of the continued and heightened investments companies are making in these areas,” Ferguson says. “You also see growth in production-related jobs as U.S. manufacturing rallies after experiencing significant losses during the recession. There is also strong demand for sales and marketing roles as companies look to grow revenue and extend their visibility and reach. Finally, there are more jobs supporting overall business operations as the economy improves.”

Top 10 Jobs for 2013

CareerBuilder and Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI) just released the results of their latest study that used EMSI’s rich labor market database, which pulls from over 90 national and state employment resources and includes detailed information on employees and self-employed workers, to find the best jobs (that require a bachelor’s degree) for 2013. Here are the top 10.

Occupations requiring a bachelor’s degrees that have produced the most jobs post-recession include:

No. 1 Software Developers (Applications and Systems Software)

70,872 jobs added since 2010, 7% growth

No. 2 Accountants and Auditors

37,123 jobs added since 2010, 3% growth

No. 3 Market Research Analysts and Marketing Specialists

31,335 jobs added since 2010, 10% growth

No. 4 Computer Systems Analysts

26,937 jobs added since 2010, 5% growth

No. 5 Human Resources, Training and Labor Relations Specialists

22,773 jobs added since 2010, 5% growth

No. 6 Network and Computer Systems Administrators

18,626 jobs added since 2010, 5% growth

No. 7 Sales Representatives (Wholesale and Manufacturing, Technical and Scientific)

17,405 jobs added since 2010, 4% growth

No. 8 Information Security Analysts, Web Developers and Computer Network Architects

15,715 jobs added since 2010, 5% growth

No. 9 Mechanical Engineers

13,847 jobs added since 2010, 6% growth

No. 10 Industrial Engineers

12,269 jobs added since 2010, 6% growth

No. 11 Computer Programmers

11,540 jobs added since 2010, 3% growth

No. 12 Financial Analysts

10,016 jobs added since 2010, 4% growth

No. 13 Public Relations Specialists

8,541 jobs added since 2010, 4% growth

No. 14 Logisticians

8,522 jobs added since 2010, 8% growth

No. 15 Database Administrators

7,468 jobs added since 2010, 7% growth

No. 16 Meeting, Convention  and Event Planners

7,072 jobs added since 2010, 10% growth

No. 17 Cost Estimators

6,781 jobs added since 2010, 3% growth

No. 18 Personal Financial Advisors

5,212 jobs added since 2010, 3% growth

Connecting an (HR) Disconnect

Can HR become aligned, or is it destined to struggle to “find itself” and thus the rest of the organization? A former colleague of mine puts forth her hypothesis!!

Connecting an (HR) Disconnect:  by Carol Anderson, Anderson Consultants

Posted on December 5, 2012

Back in the 1980s, I thought HR was disconnected. At that time, I was starting out in compensation, writing job descriptions (yippee). This was back in the days of point-factor evaluation plans where details of what the job did, what/who it was responsible for and how it influenced in the organization determined the salary grade and pay level.  Job descriptions were pretty standard, and a quick look at shrm.org says they haven’t changed much….identification data, general purpose, duties, tasks, functions, qualifications/KSAs, special requirements, ADA information.

I didn’t quite “get” the purpose of job descriptions back then (it may have been because I really didn’t like to write them). But it seemed that they were written, graded and stuffed in a drawer never to be looked at again until someone wanted the job upgraded.

After I became a hiring manager, the recruiter sat with me to create a “hiring profile”. As I described what I was looking for, it struck me that pretty much nothing I told her was reflected on the job description for the position. That seemed odd to me, but she explained that job descriptions record “jobs”, while her profile process reflected the actual “position.”

Okay, intellectually I get the difference. But I had this nagging feeling that there should be a connection somewhere. After all, aren’t we talking about the same people – those who are hired who then fill the jobs that were described?
Here we are many years later, and it feels as if there is still an opportunity to connect the various information needed for the “job”…the side of the equation that represents what the organization wants the employee to do and be. And with the knowledge work in most organizations today, we can’t afford to put people into a neat box by telling them exactly what to do.

To complicate it more, we add yet another set of criteria in the performance appraisal. Now, the employee was hired to one set of criteria, doing the job of another, and held accountable for a third. It’s enough to confuse even the most diligent employees. Learning and development may add yet another layer as they design learning objectives for training programs.

So how do we connect the disconnect? I think that there is an opportunity to collaboratively (meaning all areas of HR) come together to define the job side of the equation. Recruiting, compensation, performance management and learning should work from the same model – a model based upon a set of competencies that are shared.

I question the need for recording job duties at all. When jobs were scientifically graded based upon a point-factor process, that information formed the basis for the grade. Today though, compensation departments rarely have the staff to support effective point-factor analysis, and typically use a “General Purpose” statement to match the job to the market job. Additionally, comp staff usually work to make job descriptions more and more generic, so the duty statements become less and less relevant.

Investing time in creating effective core and functional competency models can be the linchpin that will allow all of the various HR areas to work from the same starting point. Getting all the parties in the same room to define what the job data will be used for, and then looking at commonalities can lead to a very integrated process that will make sense to the end user – the employee. After building a good competency model, based upon the organization’s business, operations and strategy, each HR discipline can use.

Let’s play that out using “Builds relationships” as a core competency.

  • Talent acquisition focuses on assessing the candidate’s experience in collaborative planning and execution and experience in working within a team environment.
  • Compensation needs to differentiate between two levels of the same job, so defines the higher level in terms of the criticality or complexity of building relationships.
  • The performance management process identifies “building relationships” as a critical success factor for those in the role,
  • And the learning and development team builds curriculum at an employee and leadership level on team, collaboration and communication.

The employee sees a consistent and holistic picture of how they are expected to behave and develop as a member of the organization. The leader coaches to help the employee build the skill, using practical examples of relationship building as it relates to the projects and processes in which the employee participates.

Can it work that way.  It absolutely can, but takes strong alignment on the part of the HR stakeholders to the ultimate vision – creating a unified road map for the end user – the employee.